Mundana / Annaprashna

DETAILS

Mundana The Chudakarana (Sanskrit: चूडाकरण, lit, arrangement of the hair tuft) or the Mundana (Sanskrit: मुण्डन, lit. tonsure), is the eighth of the sixteen Hindu saṃskāras (sacraments), in which a child receives their first haircut.
According to the Grhya Sutras, this samskara should take place at the end of first year or before the expiry of the third year, but the later authorities extend the age to the seventh year. The child’s hair is shorn, frequently leaving only the śikhā or cūḍā, a tuft at the crown of the head.
Originally, the arrangement of the śikhā was the most significant feature of the Chudakarana and the number of tufts was determined by the number of the pravaras belonging to the gotra of the child. Later, in northern India, keeping only one tuft became universal. But in the Deccan and southern India, earlier traditions remained alive to some extent.
In tradition, the hair from birth is associated with undesirable traits from past lives. Thus at the time of the mundana, the child is freshly shaven to signify freedom from the past and moving into the future. The rite is performed as a special ceremony in most homes, for young girls and boys.
At Rishikesh, on the banks of the Ganges, there is a special chudakarana or mundana samskara. In this ceremony, along with cutting and shaving hair, Vedic mantras and prayers are chanted by trained priests, acharyas and rishikumaras. The child's head is shaven and the hair is then symbolically offered to the holy river. The child and his/her family then perform a sacred yajna ceremony and the Ganga Aarti.
Annaprashna The Annaprashana (Sanskrit: अन्नप्राशन, Annaprāśana, Bengali: অন্নপ্রাশন, Onnoprashon) also known as Annaprashana vidhi, Annaprasan or Anna-prasanam or Anna Prashashan, is a Hindu ritual (Saṃskāra) that marks an infant's first intake of food other than milk. The term annaprashan literally means "food feeding" or "eating of food".[1]
The Annaprashana, unlike many other Samskaras, remains an important ceremony in modern India.
The ceremony is usually arranged in consultation with a priest, who arranges an auspicious date on which to conduct the ceremony.
It is usually carried out when the child is six to eight months old — odd months for girls and even months for boys — when the teeth have begun to appear, though the child may be weaned at a later time.[6] It is an occasion for celebration, and extended family, friends and neighbours are invited to attend.
Annaprashana is followed by Mamabhat, which takes place in the maternal uncle's or grandparents' house. In this second ceremony the child's maternal uncle feeds it rice. It is celebrated within that week because in Vedic Hindu culture the child cannot eat rice until Annaprashana and Mamabhat have both occurred. However, nowadays parents consult doctors and start rice accordingly.

Contact Us

Your Enquiry Send Successfully.
Valid Mobile Number Invalid Mobile Number